All About Municipal Spending

All About Municipal Spending

Running a municipality like the County of Grande Prairie is a balance between maintaining high-quality services and infrastructure with minimal impact to residents and businesses.

Total spending and spending per resident between different types of municipalities are not a direct comparison, as each is unique.

Here are some facts about how the County of Grande Prairie invests in continuing to be a great place to work, live and play, and a good neighbour to nearby municipalities.

  • The County has a much smaller population than the City of Grande Prairie and has a much larger geographic area, which means total spending on services per resident differs.
  • The County is responsible for building and maintaining safe infrastructure as well as a transportation network containing over 3,600 km of paved and gravelled roads and over 300 bridges and culverts. The County has more bridges than any other municipality in the province of Alberta. This amount differs between municipalities.
  • This infrastructure serves County residents, residents of neighbouring communities including the City of Grande Prairie who work in or visit the County, and business and industry that rely on these roads.
  • Transportation infrastructure costs are one of the highest expenditures, making up more than 50 per cent of the County’s total annual capital budget. Expenditures on transportation infrastructure varies across municipalities based on a number of factors.
  • The County contributes millions of dollars annually in recreation, community and culture grants to several organizations across the County and neighbouring municipalities located in the south Peace Region – including the City of Grande Prairie, the towns of Beaverlodge, Sexsmith and Wembley, the Village of Hythe, and surrounding areas.
  • The County gave out $4.3 million in 2019 to several organizations including the Grande Prairie Public Library, Grande Prairie Art Gallery, Beaverlodge Boys & Girls Camp, Wembley Agricultural Society, Sexsmith & District Museum Society, Hythe Athletic Association and many more.
  • This agreement has been in place since 2003 where on a yearly basis, the County shares municipal tax revenue of 20 per cent from co-generational facilities and 10 per cent on any new commercial/industrial development in areas serviced by Aquatera. Visit Revenue/Tax Sharing Agreement [PDF - 1 MB to view the agreement.
  • This agreement is not reciprocal in that the County does not receive funding for services used by City residents.
  • The County works with neighbouring communities to jointly deliver services that contribute to a good quality of life for all residents, including regional fire and enforcement services, emergency planning and response, safety codes, social services, rural transportation, and more.
  • An Intermunicipal Collaboration Framework (ICF) with the City of Grande Prairie is currently underway, which is one great example of collaboration on planning and addressing service delivery and service delivery funding.